Social Media Success Stories

Article from Top Rank: Online Marketing Blog – click here.

The success stories are of

1. American Express OPEN

2. HSBC

3. Microsoft

4. Archer

5. Cree

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{grow} | The Three Most Dangerous Social Media Metrics

This is absolutely awesome. Please read…

from the {grow} Blog: The Three Most Dangerous Social Media Metrics

I remember at a (recently) former company, the social media emphasis was on the number of posts written, the number of hits et al. Unfortunately: the website of the company had fewer hits than some of the better written blogs by employees (…even, blush blush, this blog); the company’s twitter feed had fewer followers than a couple of the company’s employees’. The reason was simple, the content on the website and blog were, as you could imagine, poor….

It is unfortunate.

Brain Pickings: 10 tips on Official Writing from David Ogilvy

This comes from the ethereal Brain Pickings.

A short 10-tips from David Ogilvy. On Writing. On official writing. 

And I believe that this is a tip that every serious professional will do good to take heed of.

Here, check out point 4:

4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize,demassification, attitudinally, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass.

Wiser words have hardly ever been spoken.

And here are some absolute golden words.

7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning — and then edit it.

Like many other professionals, we have been guilty of shooting off angry / impulsive emails. We are controlled guys, and consequences have never been very bad… but still, don’t…..

Our society and the culture of ‘Thank You’

You must have read the article already:

HBR| How to give a meaningful Thank You

We have been thinking about it for last couple of months, and every time the logic is boiling down to the following

Behavior
Human Beings [Social Beings [Professionals [White Collar/ Blue Collar: Hierarchy]]]
So if you devise any policy/ rule or create a corporate DNA or do behavioral development etc, keeping the above Ideal logic in mind; this will ensure that things automatically fall in place..
Let me explain the Ideal logic:
First, we are human beings – Humanity needs to be there in behavior/ policy/ law/ action/ etc etc
Second, we are social beings (remember, we are human beings first, and then the social beings) – Social customs/ norms should get the required respect in every event
Third, we are professional (remember, we are social being first, and then the professionals) – Nothing to explain, maintain professionalism
Fourth is self explanatory
Point here is, we/ companies/ institutions etc follow the reverse order –
Generally Observed (and flawed):
People are first treated on the bases of their “Collar” or their “Hierarchical Position” in the organization. Accordingly, the respect is given and behavior is shown. Then, everyone gets the treatment as a professional; social stuff is considered irrelevant for the job…think deeply it is very important to satisfy the social needs. Anyhow, then the social treatment is received by human beings (I would say social constraints are received)…A human being wants to enjoy his favorite food, but it is impressed upon him that he follows the table manner…don’t get me wrong, I am not saying you don’t follow the table manners, but sometimes Desired is given preference over Required….surely, everybody needs to be with in the control points…..
The irony is, apparently the least important thing in the entire generally observed behavioral paradigm, is Human Beings getting treated as human beings!
So… how will you run your organization? Will you, like everyone else, give lip service to respect for co-employees? Remember this though: If you cannot be human to your co-workers, they will only respect your seat / your position, and never you.

The ‘Right’ price for your shovel, (or) what has ethics got to do with it?

Remember this old post where we had written about The right price for your products?

Taking it forward from there, we would like to bring to you this post from HBR.

After a Blizzard, what’s a fair price for a shovel?

We discussed, and what follows was the quick post one of us wrote, and in fact insisted upon over email.

Haha..simple, pricing objective needs to be clear….it is not just about one season profit.

Also if we are assuming that the shopkeeper will gather inventory before the start of winter, then why won’t the consumers do the necessary preparation for the season and buy shovels and other necessities?

….now, there could be some lazy bones like me who will start digging a well when they are thirsty…also, there could be some instance where shovels will break…now, if a shopkeeper wants to squeeze money from those cases in point, it is absolutely fine, if the pricing objective is being met.

i.e if my business (my shop’s sales) is unpredictable and I am not sure about sustainability till/ during next season, and I am really in a cash crunch situation, I would milk the cow by increasing the price……think if I don’t have this unpredictable  cash crunch situation, but I increase the price, what will happen if rest of the season (even next year season) is normal winter – I will lose customer loyalty………………………………..

NOW, OF COURSE if it is not about me, but we all lobby and increase the price at once (and there is not a game theory defaulter), enjoy the profits (you may never enjoy this in future, as consumers would be extra cautious (prepared in advance) from next time onward – But not all; humans are humans) 

Shortstack: How to evaluate your Facebook page

Do you keep in touch with Shortstack? we have been, and think that their blog (sociallystacked) is a little bit excellent. Do read often, strongly recommended.

Here’s the read-today of the day.

How to evaluate your Facebook page – a checklist.

We love checklists. (Sometimes) Operations Consultants like us love checklists. Here’s one, and (what we assume is a) good one. And a practical one. So go take a dekko. Cheers.